Songlines

Tracking the Seven Sisters

Songlines Mon 21 Nov 2020 - Mon 26 Apr 2021 WA Museum Boola Bardip Mon 21 Nov 2020 - Mon 26 Apr 2021 WA Museum Boola Bardip FREE
Event info
Mon 21 Nov 2020 - Mon 26 Apr 2021 at WA Museum Boola Bardip, FREE

Presented in association with the National Museum of Australia and Western Australian Museum

Step inside the new WA Museum Boola Bardip and be transported along the epic Seven Sisters Dreaming tracks in a spectacular exhibition that features more than 300 paintings and objects, as well as song, dance, photography and innovative multimedia.

Developed in consultation with the traditional owners of the stories, Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters journeys along the ancestral routes of the Seven Sisters as they fled across deserts, pursued relentlessly by a sorcerer. Stories originally performed on country are shared in new ways, with artworks becoming portals to the deserts of the Martu, the Ngaanyatjarra and the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara peoples.

Stand under the world’s highest resolution six-metre-wide travelling DomeLab and be surrounded by images of Seven Sisters rock art from the remote Cave Hill site in South Australia, as well as animated art works, and the transit of the Orion constellation and the Pleiades star cluster. By following the trail of stunning art and installations throughout the exhibition, you effectively ‘walk’ the songlines. 

 

Time & Location

Mon 21 Nov 2020 - Mon 26 Apr 2021

Mon - Sun 9.30am - 5pm | Closed public holidays

WA Museum Boola Bardip, James Street Mall, Perth / Yandilup

Pricing

Free Event

Accessibility
Notes

Booking Required

Book on WA Museum's website

 

Acknowledgements

  • Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters is an international touring exhibition produced by the National Museum of Australia with the ongoing support of the traditional custodians and knowledge holders of this story.

Image

  • A performance of 'Kungkarangkalpa: Seven Sisters songline inma (ceremony)' at the National Museum of Australia, Canberra 2013 Image: George Serras, National Museum of Australia
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